Archives for February 2019

A Look at Divestopedia’s Article, “The Myth of Fair Business Valuation”

In Divestopedia’s article, “The Myth of Fair Business Valuation: What Professional Valuations Don’t Tell You,” author Chak Reddy is quick to point out that the “type of buyer and method of sale are two important (yet often overlooked) value determinants when finding a starting price for your business.”

Reddy brings up some excellent points.  One notion in particular that every business owner should be aware of is that there is “NO fair value for illiquid assets.”  He points to the fact that between January 2007 and March 2008, the historic Bear Stearns went from a value of $20 billion dollars to just $238 million.  In a mere 14 months, Bear Stearns lost most of its value.

Additionally, the article points to the fact that business owners often suffer enormously from “dramatic valuation compression.”  In Reddy’s view, this compression is the direct result of poor planning and a failure on the part of business owners to select the right advisory teams.

Reddy believes that professional valuations can be quite lacking.  He feels that they are “contingent on multiple assumptions,” and that the valuations are only as good as the assumptions upon which they are based.  In other words, professional valuations can be limited and flawed.  In particular, he points to the fact that two of the most important factors in valuations, future growth rate and operational synergies are “highly subjective and no two views on these topics are likely to be identical.”  Summed up another way, valuations are inherently a matter of opinion and perspective.  Reddy feels that a seller will be “lucky” if the real sales price comes within 10% to 20% of the professional valuation.

In the end, as always, it is the market that determines value. It is the acquirer who will determine the value more than any other factor.  The perception of the buyer will play a key role in the process and, further to the point, no two buyers will perceive the business exactly the same way.  In other words, valuations can be tricky and certainly do involve a personal element of the individual who is appraising the business’ value.  Adding to this point, Reddy states, “From our experience, the type of buyer and the type of sale skew the valuation to such an extent that it is unwise for a business owner to not be familiar with these variables and their impact before the beginning of the sales process.”

Ultimately, finding the right buyer is essential and this is where a business broker can prove simply invaluable.  And finding that right buyer may take time.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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5 Big Questions to Consider when Financing a Business Sale

How should the purchase of a business be structured?  This is a point that you’ll want to address early in the sale process.  For most people, buying or selling a business is one of the most, if not the most, important business decision that they will ever make.  For this reason, it is vital not to wait until the last minute to structure your deal. Let’s turn our attention to the most significant questions that you need to answer when entering the sales process.

1. What is My Lowest Price?

The first question you should ask yourself is, “What is the lowest price I’m willing to take?”  If an offer is made, the last thing you want is to be sitting around trying to decide if you can take a given offer at a given price.  You need to be ready to jump if the right offer is made.

2. What are the Tax Implications?

Secondly, you’ll want to seriously consider the tax consequences of any sale.  Taxes are always a fact of life and you need to work with a professional, such as an accountant or business broker, to understand the tax implication of any decision you make.

3. What are the Interest Rates?

The third factor you want to consider is interest rates.  If you get a buyer, what is an acceptable interest rate for a seller financed sale?

4. Are there Additional Costs Involved?

A fourth key question to ask yourself is do you have any unsecured creditors that have not been paid off?  Additionally, you’ll also want to determine whether or not the seller plans on paying for a part of the closing costs.

5. Will the Buyer Need to Assume Debt?

Finally, will the buyer need to assume any long-term or secured debt?  The issue of long term and/or secured debt is no small issue. Be sure to clarify this important point well in advance.  Also keep in mind that favorable terms typically translate to a higher sales price.

Business brokers are experts at buying and selling all kinds of businesses.  When it comes time to structure a deal that benefits both the buyer and the seller, business brokers can prove to be invaluable.  At the end of the day, working with a business broker is one of the single biggest steps you can take to ensure that your business is sold and sold as quickly as possible.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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